Brugernavn: Kodeord:
Artikel om hjerneskader i kampsport - Meget interessant // Martialarts.dk
Artikel om hjerneskader i kampsport - Meget interessant
MMAshop.dk
Denne tråd er vist 6109 gange og besvaret 25 gange

(Du skal være logget ind for at kunne abonnere på tråde)
12/2-2010, 22:58

Nicolas



Antal indlæg: 4905
Online 43d 3t 7m
København
www.rumblesport...
www.rumblesport...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


http://www.sherdog.com/news/articles/Fistic-Medicine-Dementia-Pugilistica-amp-MMA-22581

Sherdog.com skrev:
Thursday, February 11, 2010
by Matt Pitt (mpitt@sherdog.com)

22581
I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary; the evil it does is permanent. - Mahatma Gandhi

It is rare to hear an athletic commission refer to criminality, particularly in respect to their own actions. But the case of Terry Norris was inescapable, even to Nevada State Athletic Commission Chairman Dr. Elias Ghanem.

"We will be really criminal if we let that happen the way he is now," Ghanem said, referring to Norris' appeal to have his boxing license reinstated.

Norris was a skilled lightweight boxer with fast hands and knockout power. He had a brilliant amateur career (291-4) before moving on to a 47-9 professional career and several years as champion. In February 2000, attempting a comeback, Norris appealed to the NSAC for reinstatement of his license. After witnessing Norris' slurred speech at the hearing, and comparing it to tapes of intact speech from only a few years prior, the request was unanimously denied.

Norris's camp explained the slurred speech was due to "lazy speech syndrome" -- a condition unknown to medicine. The commission, voiced by its vice chairman, disagreed: "We believe there is evidence of chronic brain injury. He should not fight again.”

Terry Norris was 33 years old -- a young but not atypical victim of Dementia Pugilistica.

* * *


For well over a century, people involved in the world of fight sport have known that old age is harsh on fighters. In the 1920s a landmark paper was published detailing a syndrome of crippling senility in former fighters -- Dementia Pugilistica. At that time the prevalence of the disease was found to be approximately 20 percent of professional fighters. In the ensuing 100 years little changed: Today the rate of Dementia Pugilistica is still approximately 20 percent, and science has no idea what makes some fighters susceptible and others resistant.

Dementia Pugilistica, also known as Boxers' Dementia or Punch Drunk Syndrome, develops gradually and is irreversible. The early signs are subtle: changes in personality, impaired judgment, confusion, discrete deficits in memory. Over time the psychiatric complications become more profound--paranoia, impulsivity, aggression, depression, and ultimately functional dementia. Neuromotor dysfunction coincides with the psychiatric decline. Sufferers endure slurred speech, tremors, gait disturbance and gradually decline into immobility.

Research on Dementia Pugilistica has brought two primary things to light. First, although the disease was long thought to be an acceleration of normal aging, perhaps a form of Alzheimer's disease brought on by trauma, the evidence proves otherwise. Alzheimer's disease produces scarring diffusely throughout the brain, but autopsy studies of ex-boxer's brains show a very different pattern of injury. In boxers' brains the scarring is predominantly along the surfaces of the brain, most commonly along the frontal and temporal lobes where punches have led to repeated contact between the bony prominences of the inner skull and the delicate surface of the brain.

The second important modern discovery regarding boxers' dementia is that it is not limited to boxers. Former rugby players, football players and wrestlers such as Chris Benoit have all been known to suffer from neuro-psychiatric diseases similar to boxers. Modern autopsy studies have proven what was long suspected -- these athlete’s brains have the same lesions as Dementia Pugilistica. The term Dementia Pugilistica, applying only to “pugilists,” is outdated: The disease is now known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

This has been a watershed moment: Boxer's dementia has been rebranded and mainstreamed. No longer is CTE fight sport's dirty little secret. With Hall of Fame NFL players speaking openly about their disease, with autopsy studies on 18-year-old football players showing pathognomonic brain scarring, CTE can no longer be marginalized.

It’s well known that the NFL has recently taken an active interest in CTE. Less well known is that the science behind the NFL’s new concern comes primarily from fighters. The NFL’s appropriation of boxing’s brain damage data is well founded; skull accelerations in head punches are similar to football collisions -- 50-80 g's. That bears repeating: These athletes’ brains endure jolts 50 to 60 times the acceleration of gravity. Until recently football apologists argued that their sport was safer than boxing because of the relative paucity of knockouts and the use of helmets. These arguments have been proven to be fatuous. Helmets offer only a fig leaf of protection to acceleration, and sub-knockout concussions -- being “dazed” or “dinged” -- have been strongly implicated in CTE.

This last datum is the most worrisome for fighters. Even blows to the head that don’t cause a knockout -- the euphemistically named minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI) -- cause cumulative permanent damage. In Terry Norris’ pro career, he suffered only a handful of knockouts. But in his whole career, all 351 fights, it is impossible to know how many head blows and low-grade concussions he endured. And it is that data that may be the most important. For any competitor in fight sport the number of blows to the head is incalculable: uncounted hours of sparring, amateur fights, professional fights -- even a short career entails tens of thousands of MTBI events. How many blows to the head has Couture endured? Nogueira? Wanderlei Silva?

* * *


It is true that there is compelling evidence that MMA is safer than boxing. But “safer” is not safe. MMA fighters are starting younger, are enticed by the money involved to fight longer and eventually MMA will have a cohort of neurologically impaired veterans of its own. With the overwhelming medical, scientific and epidemiologic evidence that a career worth of head blows leads to CTE in one out of five fighters, the moral imperative for some meaningful change is inarguable. The sport is too good not to be better.

Unfortunately, even if the need for greater safety is clear, what actually can be done to lessen the danger of CTE in combat sports is less certain. Football or rugby can adapt new equipment or rules to lessen the danger; fight sport has less clear options. In general, most of a fighter's head blows -- if not the most severe -- will occur during training, out of reach of promoters and athletic commissions. Heavily padded gloves may paradoxically worsen the danger. Headgear appears to be of limited use, may even be harmful and, in any event, is unpopular with fighters and fans alike.

Further, it is difficult to stop what cannot be demonstrated to exist in real-time. Pre-autopsy testing for MTBI is effectively unavailable. The commonly used CAT scan -- which does show bleeding -- does not show MTBI. Blood tests for evidence of brain injury are unreliable, and lumbar puncture testing is impractical. The long delay between traumatic insult in a fight and onset of symptoms means that a fighter who shows no quantifiable evidence of injury during his career can still develop CTE at a relatively young age.

* * *


Almost certainly the greatest barrier to preventing CTE in fight sport will be the tolerance of promoters and fans. Violence sells. A Google search for "Top 10 MMA Knockouts" produces 60,000 hits. A search for "Top 10 MMA well-fought three-round decisions" is strangely silent. The violence is promoted and well compensated, the harm it causes de-emphasized and well hidden.

But there is reason for hope: The Nevada State Athletic Commission vice chairman mentioned in this article who was so disturbed by Terry Norris' fight-related brain damage is a familiar figure to fight fans: Mr. Lorenzo Fertitta. I understand he has some pull in the world of MMA. We shall see how he uses it.

Matt Pitt is a physician with degrees in biophysics and medicine. He is board-certified in emergency medicine and has post-graduate training in head injuries and multi-system trauma. To ask a question that could be answered in a future article, e-mail him at mpitt@sherdog.com.



Hvad tænker I efter at have læst denne artikel?

Er det for dig risikoen værd at træne kampsport hvis man potentielt kan blive en af de 20% som udvikler Dementia Pugilistica/Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)?

Hvis ja, hvad gør at du føler det er risikoen værd?

Jeg må indrømme at jeg selv lige skal tygge lidt på det inden jeg kan svare på mine egne spørgsmål.




---
Lets rock!
13/2-2010, 0:45

Kari Gunnarsso



Antal indlæg: 1830
Online 6d 23t 42m
Amager
CSA


Lilla forumbælte
(1500+ indlæg)


qeySuS ID #448934
Puha, det er godt nok en højere procent en jeg havde forstillet mig. Men det er jo også en grotesk mængde af kampe, over 350! (regner med at med så mange har han også kæmpet som junior, som næppe hjælper). Det er jo mere en 350% flere kampe en det samlede antal som alle UFC's champs har haft.

Er der nogle procent tal fra thaiboksning? Forstiller mig at det er lidt mere relevant eftersom at der er så mange flere muligheder for slag som ikke involverer hovedet.


---
"I´m in a glasscage of emotion!" -Ron Burgundy
13/2-2010, 1:06

Nicolas



Antal indlæg: 4905
Online 43d 3t 7m
København
www.rumblesport...
www.rumblespor...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


PimpDaddy ID #448936
@ det med tal fra thai? Umiddelbart ikke, ihvertfald ikke i den artikel fra Sherdog som har jeg citeret i fuld længde ovenfor.


---
Lets rock!
13/2-2010, 9:37

Martin Schlütt

Antal indlæg: 361
Online 4d 3t 30m
Randers
Randers Muay Th...


Gult forumbælte
(300+ indlæg)


martinsch ID #448951
Ja det må jo være mest udbredt hos regulære boksere, da de umiddelbart har flest slag til hovedet.

Men når det er sagt, så står der jo også at den største del af skaden sker i træningslokalerne og der må træningsvolumen nok tages med i betragtningen. Jeg træner i hvert fald ikke lige så ofte (eller længe), som pro boksere i USA, så den 20% risiko bliver automatisk reduceret betragteligt.


---
No rice? No power!
13/2-2010, 9:44



Antal indlæg: 746
Online 7d 1t 31m


Blåt forumbælte
(500+ indlæg)


barroomhero ID #448953
det er sgu lidt skræmmende..
20% er meget .. kan være man bare skulle holde sig til gulvkampen (og også droppe wrestlingen - bare trække guard eller halfguard med det samme)


---
Respekter din, og andres, GGM og GM.
13/2-2010, 13:37

Jakob Hasen

Antal indlæg: 8
Online 0d 0t 35m
Odense
ingen pt.


Hvidt forumbælte
(< 100 indlæg)


Ximbo ID #448968
Føler på egen krop selv at når jeg får nogen ordentlige slag i hovedet at efter flg. dage, kan jeg få knæk lyde inde fra selve hovedet og til tider ret ondt :S .. Hvor vidt det har med slagene at gøre ved jeg ikke, men ved at hvis jeg ikke træner i fx. 2 uger i en ferie er der intet.


Skræmmende artikel egentlig :S
13/2-2010, 17:22

Mads



Antal indlæg: 1869
Online 9d 9t 26m
Odense C.
Bushido BJJ Ode...


Lilla forumbælte
(1500+ indlæg)


Mad$ ID #448971
Jaeee. Det problem har de vist hverken i Greco-Roman eller Freestyle Wrestling ... Har heller ikke hørt om så mange Judokaer med hjerneskader ... Men pyt, man er jo ung nu. But Why worry about ones little ol' brain, Homer Simpson woulden't!


---
Sweep the leg!
14/2-2010, 21:17

Nissen



Antal indlæg: 1592
Online 7d 20t 45m
Odense
--
www.fightercen...


Lilla forumbælte
(1500+ indlæg)


Nissen ID #449081


---
Den ultimative stilart findes ikke...
16/2-2010, 10:51

Hørnell



Antal indlæg: 4579
Online 9d 15t 0m
Ballerup
Rumblesports/CS...
www.movementdo...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


Default ID #449191
Den giver mig ikke lige frem lyst til at boksesparre.


---
Som i resten af livet er MMA udgaven også her meget bedre -ADS-Newbie
16/2-2010, 10:57

Mads



Antal indlæg: 1869
Online 9d 9t 26m
Odense C.
Bushido BJJ Ode...


Lilla forumbælte
(1500+ indlæg)


Mad$ ID #449192
Jeg giver dig gerne en krammer i påsken istedet Lars


---
Sweep the leg!
16/2-2010, 11:33

Hørnell



Antal indlæg: 4579
Online 9d 15t 0m
Ballerup
Rumblesports/CS...
www.movementdo...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


Default ID #449195
Glæder jeg mig til Mads


---
Som i resten af livet er MMA udgaven også her meget bedre -ADS-Newbie
16/2-2010, 12:38

Hørnell



Antal indlæg: 4579
Online 9d 15t 0m
Ballerup
Rumblesports/CS...
www.movementdo...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


Default ID #449203
Efter at have tygget lidt på den, så viser den (artiklen) at det er ret vigtigt at tænke over nødvendigheden af hård sparring kontra tekniktræning med lette sparrings elementer.

Den fortæller mig helt klart at jeg
1) IKKE skal sparre med folk der er større end mig selv, med mindre det er ultra let og man kender dem i forvejen. Er rendt ind i alt for mange der der mener at 20% sparring stadig skal være med 70% kraft i.
2) Få trænet så meget som muligt uden for sparringen


---
Som i resten af livet er MMA udgaven også her meget bedre -ADS-Newbie
17/2-2010, 13:46

Morten



Antal indlæg: 7328
Online 23d 6t 29m
Haderslev/Holst...
Tkd/KickB./Aiki...
www.raredog.dk


Sort forumbælte
(5000+ indlæg)


The Chicken ID #449318
Det sætter da nogle tanker igang - og efter en hård sparring eller en kickboxing kamp har man jo også typisk en fin lille snurren i hovedet resten af dagen...

Men som alt andet må man veje risikoen op mod fornøjelsen - og på mit niveau vurderer jeg at det er risikoen værd


---
www.raredog.dk - Retro, Rockabilly og MA T-shirts
19/2-2010, 19:40



Antal indlæg: 1091
Online 2d 19t 51m


Blåt forumbælte
(500+ indlæg)


karate kid (BRUGER SLETTET AF ADMIN) ID #449484
hm, respekt for Jeres sport, med er det virkelig risikoen værd??? Jeg tænker at det er rimeligt logisk at man tager skade af mange slag/spark i hovedet, hvilket jeg tidligere har argumenteret for herinde.
19/2-2010, 20:07

Brian Groneman



Antal indlæg: 2592
Online 20d 0t 31m
Kbh Ø
www.rumblesport...


Lilla forumbælte
(1500+ indlæg)


Burarüm ID #449485








Er det virkelig det værd?! det ved jeg sgu ik,men jeg vil hellere leve livet end pakke mig selv ind i vat...


---
Posture Pressure & Possibilities
19/2-2010, 21:25

Nicolas



Antal indlæg: 4905
Online 43d 3t 7m
København
www.rumblesport...
www.rumblespor...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


PimpDaddy ID #449489
Karate Kid skrev:
hm, respekt for Jeres sport, med er det virkelig risikoen værd??? Jeg tænker at det er rimeligt logisk at man tager skade af mange slag/spark i hovedet, hvilket jeg tidligere har argumenteret for herinde.


Bare så alle kan følge med, hvem mener du når du skriver "Jeres"?


---
Lets rock!
19/2-2010, 21:35



Antal indlæg: 1091
Online 2d 19t 51m


Blåt forumbælte
(500+ indlæg)


karate kid (BRUGER SLETTET AF ADMIN) ID #449491
Pimpdaddy: Jeg mener de af Jer der dyrker Jeres sport på et niveau hvor der er mulighed for hjerneskader.
20/2-2010, 0:08

Nicolas



Antal indlæg: 4905
Online 43d 3t 7m
København
www.rumblesport...
www.rumblespor...


Brunt forumbælte
(3000+ indlæg)


PimpDaddy ID #449497
Hvorfor så ikke skrive "vores"?


---
Lets rock!
20/2-2010, 14:15



Antal indlæg: 1091
Online 2d 19t 51m


Blåt forumbælte
(500+ indlæg)


karate kid (BRUGER SLETTET AF ADMIN) ID #449520
Pimpdaddy. Det er en meget alvorlig og vedkommende tråd du har startet. Derfor forstår jeg ikke hvorfor du stiller mig de "dumme" spørgsmål. Er din intention at forplumre dig egen tråd, eller hvad?

Men for at hjælpe dig lidt på vej, skal jeg svare på dit spørgsmål alligevel: Jeg skriver ikke Vores, fordi jeg ikke regner mig selv med ("traditionel" karate)i den/de risikogrupper som nævnes i artiklen.

God træning
20/2-2010, 16:27

Stefan Agger

Antal indlæg: 480
Online 1d 16t 37m
Lemvig
Randori.dk


Gult forumbælte
(300+ indlæg)


stefanagger ID #449528
Nu ved jeg ikke hvad Hr. Daddy mente med sine spørgsmål, men helt uvedkommende for karate er det da ikke.

Der er da mange karateudøvere, der træner med sparring, og da din profil er tom, kan man jo ikke vide om du træner knockdown karate eller kataer dagen lang.
21/2-2010, 1:50

stefan eliasen

Antal indlæg: 108
Online 0d 11t 38m


Gråt forumbælte
(100+ indlæg)


kugor ID #449565
risikoen er det værd, den eneste ting der er sikkert her i livet er at vi alle ende med at miste det til sidst. selvfølgelig få det en til at tænke sig ekstra om hvis, man er i en kampsport hvor der kommer mange slag til hovedet. med hensyn til traditionel karate Karatekid har i så fået undersøgt hvor mange der få lever og nyresvigt hos jer, når hovedparten af jeres slag/spark lander i maveregionen?


---
det kun den der træner som bliver stærkere.
21/2-2010, 10:46



Antal indlæg: 1091
Online 2d 19t 51m


Blåt forumbælte
(500+ indlæg)


karate kid (BRUGER SLETTET AF ADMIN) ID #449576
Nej det har vi ikke så vidt jeg er orienteret, og jeg kender heller ikke nogen som har haft nyresvigt/leverskader, men man ved jo aldrig? Men nu er det jo også de mere alvorlige hjerneskader som tråden handler om. Og jeg må sige at det er forbavsende få der har reageret, hvorfor mon?


23/2-2010, 11:01

Morten



Antal indlæg: 7328
Online 23d 6t 29m
Haderslev/Holst...
Tkd/KickB./Aiki...
www.raredog.dk


Sort forumbælte
(5000+ indlæg)


The Chicken ID #449751
Formentlig fordi at mange ikke træner det på et plan hvor risikoen er stor - og dem der gør har jo truffet et valg.

Statistisk er risikoen for at dø i en ulykke størst ved et meteor nedslag.

Skal vi kravle i bunkeren nu?


---
www.raredog.dk - Retro, Rockabilly og MA T-shirts
24/2-2010, 9:35





Antal indlæg: 332
Online 5d 18t 35m


Gult forumbælte
(300+ indlæg)


JHE ID #449838
Puha...ikke en rar artikel.

Jeg vil nok ikke kravle i bunkeren, men det får mig da til at tænke lidt over sagerne. Der har jo aldrig været tvivl om at det er usundt at få slag i hovedet, men at odds for skader skulle være så høje, er ikke super fedt at høre.

Jeg elsker træningen og det er en stor del af mit liv, som giver energi og overskud til arbejde, familie etc. så jeg vil ikke leve uden. Men jeg er også ret sikker på at jeg, hvis jeg skulle få en hjerneskade, nok ikke ville mene at det havde været det hele værd.

Noget andet er hvis man træner for at blive pro, så er det et andet sats...men det gør sig ikke gældende for mit vedkommende...så jeg vil nok, med stor sikkerhed, tænke mere over hård sparring i fremtiden. Hvem ved om jeg er disponeret.

Som tidligere nævnt tager vi chancer hele tiden, i alt hvad vi gør og derfor må den rationelle tilgang være, hele tiden at tænke i at minimere risikoen for skade/uheld hvor det er muligt...Men vi mennesker er jo ikke altid rationelle :-) jeg både festryger, kører uden cykelhjelm og går fuld hjem fra byen i en Canada Goose jakke :-)
24/2-2010, 9:55

Guldlossen



Antal indlæg: 6668
Online 15d 6t 16m
Birkerød
Kickboxing Acad...
www.kickboxing...


Sort forumbælte
(5000+ indlæg)


Claus Poulsen ID #449842
Jeg synes faktisk ikke, at 20 % for professionelle boksere er et overraskende højt tal.

Tværtimod finder jeg det overraskende og positivt, at 80 % af profesionelle boksere åbenbart fuldfører karrieren uden at få symptomer på hjerneskader.

Det er ærgeligt, at artiklen ikke nævner om man har undersøgt kampmængden og træningsmængden hos de 20 % der er blevet skadet. Det eneste eksempel er bokseren med 351 kampe og det kan jo ikke overføres til 99,9 % af de danske kickboxere, thaiboksere, MMA-kæmpere, osv...


---
People who think the know everything are very annoying to those of us that really do

Super letvægts BJJ gi

Svar på indlæg
Emne:

Brugernavn:

Kodeord:


;-) = :tvp = :eek =
:-D = :pimp = :-P =
:\ = :smokin = :rofl =
:( = :lol = :ninja =
:) = :oel = :freak =

Citat:
Billede:
Youtube:

[quote=bruger]Citat[/quote]
[img]http://www.x.dk/billede.jpg[/img]
[youtube](youtube video id)[/youtube]
Tekst:

Preview






Copyright 2001-2019 by MartialArts.dk | Kontakt: graugart@gmail.com
Chart.dk